Blog Archives

War Memory and Reconciliation / Japan’s Emperor System


Dr. Jennifer Lind (2010) does a fine job of laying out her theoretical framework for when and how (or even if) contrition––i.e., the “apologetic remembrance” of crimes committed in the heat of war––can foster a period of reconciliation among nations with bad blood between them. Drawing on two case studies to advance her thesis––which is that “the [preponderant] view that international reconciliation requires apologies and other contrite gestures” (Lind, 2010, p. 3) is right-minded but quite full of hyperbole in its singular faith in the moral authority of a sincere expression of regret––Dr. Lind (2010) argues for a “middle ground between whitewashing and contrition.” (p. 190) Read the rest of this entry

Mapping Out the Complexities of North Korea’s Geopolitical Position in the Far East


In dealing with North Korea, the U.S. has tried tact and discretion, threats and intimidation. However, with nothing having worked, experts believe the U.S. has resigned itself to the fact that the ruling Kim family is here to stay.  In their estimation, America’s judicious use of tact has been nothing short of humiliating for the U.S., while its efforts to intimidate, sometimes by the imposition of targeted economic sanctions against the ruling elite (e.g., on luxury items), have fared better by only the slightest of margins.  Indeed, the claim can be made that only once in recent history has North Korea truly had cause to cooperate, when, in September 2005, U.S. sanctions targeted Macao’s Banco Delta Asia, a bank with illicit ties to several North Korean companies including the state-owned Zokwang Trading Company; rumor has it that when North Korea’s assets in Macao were frozen, such was the resultant economic backlash, which reportedly interfered with Kim Jong-il’s notoriously opulent lifestyle, that the ‘Dear Leader’ was compelled at long last to seek common ground with his enemies. Read the rest of this entry

Tokyo 2020: History Repeated?


Since its decision on Sept. 7, 2013 to approve Tokyo’s bid to host the 2020 Summer Olympics, the International Olympic Committee (I.O.C.) has been roundly criticized for its refusal and/or inability to grasp the severity of the ongoing nuclear crisis in Fukushima. The I.O.C.’s detractors are certainly right to express their concerns about how the radioactive contamination in and around Fukushima might affect nearby Tokyo. However, in so doing, they have neglected to describe how else Tokyo’s selection, an inadvertent yet implicit endorsement of Japan’s recent propensity for behaving aggressively, might be disquieting. Read the rest of this entry

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